These activities will help SC 4th Grade students reinforce their math skills outside of the classroom.

  • Play the game Close to 1000.
  • Write three facts about the number 28. Is this number prime or composite? How do you know? Round this number to the nearest 10.
  • A lawn water sprinkler rotates 65 degrees and pauses. It then rotates 25 more degrees in the same direction. What is the total degree rotation of the sprinkler? To cover a full 360 degrees, how many more degrees will it move?
  • Read A Grain of Rice by Helena Pittman. Calculate how many grains of rice she will receive on day 18. How many will she have altogether?
  • Visit the website www.multiplication.com  Choose some activities to have fun practicing multiplication. Record choices.
  • Solve the riddle: I have 5 in the tenths place. I have 7 in the thousandths place. I have 4 in the ones place. I have 2 in the hundredths place. What decimal am I? Write your own riddle.
  • Go to http://www.gregtangmath.com/. Choose some worksheets to complete.
  • With a partner take turns scooping coins from a cup. Write the total in dollars and cents using decimal notation. Compare totals using <, >, or =. Take ten turns.
  • Skip count by 5ʼs starting at 1. What patterns do you notice? Explain why you think these patterns are happening.
  • Play the Product Game at www.illuminations.nctm.org Record the strategy that you used.
  • Identify, record and classify angles: acute (less than 90°) obtuse (greater than 90°), right (90°) in everyday things (buildings, bridges, furniture…)
  • Write down the names and prices of 5 cars you find in the newspaper. Order the prices from least to greatest. Round the prices to the nearest thousand.
  • 15 friends want to order pizza for dinner. They predict that each person will eat 1/3 of a pizza. How many pizzas should they order? What if there were 9 friends and they each ate 1/3 of a pizza?
  • Visit the website www.setgame.com Play and enter to win a prize!
  • The sum of two mixed numbers is 5. What might the two mixed numbers be?
    Show as many different solutions as you can. Explain your strategy.
  • Play Multiplication Compare.
  • Play a strategy game. What strategy did you use? Would you use it again?
  • Make a paper airplane and fly it. Measure how far it goes. Try a few times. Record distances in your journal. Is it more accurate to use kilometers, meters or centimeters to measure?
  • Play Baseball at www.funbrain.com Challenge yourself.
  • Find the area of your bedroom floor. What room in your house could have about twice the area of your bedroom or about half the area of your room? Check.
  • Write down the numbers you see on 2 license plates. Create 4 math problems with these numbers using all 4 operations (+, -, x, ÷).
  • Tom and Ben ordered a pizza for lunch. They each ate 1/3 of the pizza. How much pizza was eaten? How much pizza was left?
  • Draw a design using symmetry. What makes your design symmetrical?
  • Visit the website www.mathplayground.com. Play the logic games. How did you do?
  • There are two cakes on the counter that are the same size. The first cake has ½ of it left. The second has 5/12 of it left. Which cake has more of it left? Prove your answer.
  • Measure 10 objects to the nearest ¼, ½, or 1/8 inch. Put the data on a line plot. How many objects measured 1⁄4 inch? 1⁄2 inch? Add the objects together end to end. What is the total length?
  • The difference between two mixed numbers is 31⁄4. What might the two mixed numbers be? Show as many different solutions as you can. Explain your strategy.
  • Play Close to 1000.
  • Play Concentration at www.illuminations.nctm.org
  • Choose: fractions, face down. Draw pictures that represent some fractions. Vowels are worth $50 each, consonants are worth $40. Can you make a word worth exactly $200? $600?
  • I earn $5 per hour babysitting and $4 per hour for weeding the garden. Last week I did 7 hours babysitting and 6 hours weeding. How much more money do I need to buy a game that costs $80.00?
  • Play Fraction Game at www.illuminations.nctm.org How many moves did it take to get all the red markers to the right side? Can you beat your score?
  • Measure the perimeter of two different sized windows in your home. Find the difference of the perimeters.
  • A cake recipe calls for you to use 3⁄4 cup of milk, 1⁄4 cup of oil, and 2/4 cup of water. How much liquid was needed to make the cake? Is this more or less than a pint? How do you know?
  • Write a word problem whose answer is 154. Have someone solve the problem.
  • List some capital letters (H, F…) that have one pair of parallel lines. Are there any that have two pair of parallel lines or three?
  • Make the largest and smallest numbers you can find using the digits 4, 1, 7, 8, and 2.
    Find their difference and sum.
  • Try a new activity at www.coolmath4kids.com Challenge yourself. What did you choose to do?
  • What factors can you use in this equation, x 5 = , to make a product that is an odd number between 30 and 60? Show all possible solutions. Explain your strategy.
  • Use 5 playing cards to make the largest 5-digit number possible. Represent the number in numeral, word and expanded forms. Repeat with 5 more cards.
  • Visit the game room at www.aplusmath.com Record what you played.
  • Have a scavenger hunt for real-world examples of parallel lines (ex. railroad tracks).
  • Play a game. What strategy did you use? Would you use that strategy again?
  • A regular pentagon measures 2 1⁄8 cm on one side. What is the perimeter of the pentagon?
  • Sally is five years old. Her mom is eight times older. How old is Sally’s mom?